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Top-Ranked Activist App Invites Consumers To Complain and Get Results

Complaints Submitted By Hyundai Customers Exposed False MPG Claims
Contact Info
Name:

Jamie Court & Carmen Balber

Phone Number:
Jamie: (310) 392-0075 or Carmen: 202-629-3043

Washington, DC – Online complaints from fed-up Hyundai customers across the country launched a Consumer Watchdog investigation into the automaker’s false fuel economy claims that led to the first-ever EPA recall of multiple models’ false window stickers and a lawsuit on behalf of deceived consumers.

The Consumer Watchdog mobile application, ranked in the Top 200 on iPhone and iPad at the Apple App store, gives consumers the ability to submit complaints about companies and products as rip-offs occur. The complaints give Consumer Watchdog’s advocates the information and ammunition they need to change corporate practices and help consumers who have been deceived.

Download the app in the Apple App store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/consumer-watchdog/id580994842?ls=1&mt=8

“Consumers’ complaints matter. They tipped us off to Hyundai’s inflated MPG claims and launched the investigation that ultimately led to a recall of false window stickers and a lawsuit on behalf of customers who relied on the inflated MPG claims when they purchased their vehicles. The new Consumer Watchdog app makes it easier for consumers to blow the whistle and warn us, and other consumers, about other unfair practices and corporate rip-offs,” said Carmen Balber, Washington DC director for Consumer Watchdog.

Recent consumer complaints that can be read on the app include:

Todd from Maryland - Hyundai: “I purchased a 2013 hyundai santa fe sport in late october and my decision was very much influenced by the stated MPG sticker. …I chose a more expensive vechicle [sic] because the MPG sticker was the same as the tuscon and better than the 2012 Santa Fe. I feel I was misled and the vehicle was wrongly advertised. I would not have purchased this vehicle if I knew its actual MPG. Is there a way I can return this vehicle for my money back?"

Jason from California – Anthem Blue Cross: “I was informed that my monthly premium is going to increase again, this time by an additional 24.6% effective February 1, 2013! With this latest increase my policy has increased by 76% (!) in just over two years with Anthem. …I have no understanding how Anthem Blue Cross can propose sch an increase at a time when medical inflation is running at historic lows nationwide along with a stagnant ailing economy."

Fran from Texas - Transunion: “I used the internet to get a ‘free credit report’. I did not sign up to use their service. I have been billed for 3 months. I have called them each month. They promised to refund and stop debiting my account. They haven’t. …They are stealing from me and won’t stop.”

James from Illinois - Ford: “I have been fighting with Ford Motor Company since I first purchased my 2011 Ford F-150 with the ‘EcoBoost’ motor. Ford claimed the EcoBoost could achieve 22MPG highway and 18 overall. …Now with 7800 miles on the vehicle I am still getting 13 to 14 mpg average and 16 highway. …I’m fed up with companies taking advantage of buyers through false advertising when gas prices are near $4 per gallon."

Linda from California - DirecTV: “Moved from Florida to California. Had DirecTV in Florida no problem, hooked up service out here and was told by a rep. that my bill was only 150.79, so that is what I paid. Come Augusts bill, there was an over due balance for June and July when the service was to be turned off. …I paid directly through DirecTV’s website and they never honored my payments and now want 301.28 saying that is for past due bills which I am not paying cause what if they don’t honor that payment either."

Consumers can submit complaints and choose to make them public for others to read, or submit them confidentially if sensitive information is involved.

The Consumer Watchdog app also includes news features, a citizen action center to contact lawmakers, and a feature called the DogHouse, where the public can satirize a politician, company or faulty product and share it on social media. Nine meme-like templates let the public take a photo and literally put a politician in the Dog House, set corporate executives’ “pants on fire” or call out a lobbyist who’s swimming in cash.

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