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Technology That Tracks Your Emotions In Stores And Accusations That Amazon Is Inflating Sale Prices

WKYC TV-3 NBC CLEVELAND, OH
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Amazon Exaggerations?

Consumers getting ready for Prime Day may be disappointed by accusations it’s exaggerating discounts, by advertising "before sale" prices that were inflated sometimes up to 70 percent.

A non-profit group called the Consumer Watchdog says it looked at hundreds of products sold there last month and found nearly 4 in 10 of the listed discounts were fake.

The group filed petitions with the California Attorney General, and has asked the FTC and Justice Department to look into this. It's also sparked a class action suit.

I reached out to Amazon and they told me "The report published by Consumer Watchdog is again misleading. We are obsessed with maintaining customer trust, and work hard to provide meaningful reference prices."

Now if they're really faking those prices, it is illegal. But bottom line, their prices are still some of the lowest you can find. And if it's a good deal I'm buying it.

Retailers Playing Eye-Spy

Now despite the great prices you can get online, there are people who refuse to internet shop because they know retailers track their shopping and search habits. There are also people who won't even download coupons to their phone because of that reason. And this next story will make them nuts.

Some stores are using new spy techniques to monitor customer’s facial expressions, heart rate and even pupil dilation as they shop

They're installing emotion detection cameras, some hidden in mannequins eyes, to read things like a shopper’s reaction to an outfit, what they buy, how long linger or if they’ve ever been in the store before.

Some customers have also been asked to wear "galvanometer" gadgets which track moisture on the skin which indicates arousal.

The cameras are also being used to alert staff if they see a shopper needs help.