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Corporateering

News Story
2/18/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
When it comes to privacy, is the Googleplex speaking with one voice? A new Google privacy controversy has revealed conflicting messages and actions between two different factions within the company: those working to protect consumer privacy on the one hand, and those seeking to improve advertising and social networking on the other. Meanwhile...
News Story
2/18/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
Search giant and others bypass privacy settings to keep track of our online habits Google and several other advertising companies are bypassing the privacy settings in Apple's Safari browser, according to a report from a Stanford University researcher that set off a heated debate on Friday. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday night...
News Release
2/17/2012
Posted by John M. Simpson
SANTA MONICA, CA – In the wake of a Stanford University researcher’s study that found Google has been violating people’s online privacy choices, Consumer Watchdog said today the Internet giant was lying to users and called for the Federal Trade Commission to act.  iPhone and iPad users were targeted. “Google has...
News Story
2/17/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
The Consumer Watchdog advocacy group today asked the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether Google violated a previous privacy agreement with the FTC by tracking cookies in a way that circumvents default privacy settings in Apple's Safari browser. Google's method of getting around Safari's default blockage of third-party...
News Story
2/17/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
Google's alleged circumvention of do-not-track controls on Apple's Safari browser could lead to big fines from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission if the agency. Google's alleged circumvention of do-not-track controls on Apple's Safari browser could lead to big fines from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission if the agency determines...
News Story
2/17/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
Researchers have discovered that Google deliberately bypassed the privacy settings in Safari, the Web browser on the iPhone and other Apple devices, so it could customize Web ads. The crux of the story, as reported by The Wall Street Journal in an article that is stirring much discussion online: By exploiting a loophole in the Safari browser,...
News Story
2/17/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
Google is on the defensive after The Wall Street Journal revealed the company has been tracking Apple Safari users in violation of the Web browser's privacy settings. Google says the tracking was inadvertent and the problem has been fixed. But Rep. Mary Bono Mack (R-Calif.), who was already scrutinizing Google over planned changes to its...
News Story
2/17/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
(Updates with more Google’s comments in 11th paragraph.) Feb. 17 (Bloomberg) -- Google Inc. violated users’ privacy on Apple Inc.’s Safari Web browser, Stanford University research found, adding to a drumbeat of criticism from consumer groups over how the search giant tracks people online. Using its DoubleClick ad network,...
News Story
2/17/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
Google is among a handful of companies that used a certain unusual characteristic of Apple's Safari Web browser to insert tracking cookies on users' machines, according to recent research from a Stanford grad student. The news has outraged consumer advocacy groups, though Google claims it was using known Safari functionality to provide...
News Story
2/17/2012
Posted by Mark Reback
The day after a Wall Street Journal report that Google and other ad networks bypassed settings on Apple‘s Safari Web browser — which doesn’t allow certain third-party cookies — reactions are mixed. While some tech bloggers are saying, basically, that the WSJ report is blowing this thing out of proportion, one persistent...