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Video
3/14/2013
Posted by Consumer Watchdog
John Simpson of the Consumer Watchdog privacy project on the FTC's report on twitter disclosures.
News Story
3/12/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
Seven million dollars. That’s how much Internet giant Google will pay to settle a multi-year investigation into its controversial “Wi-Spy” data collection practices. The furor erupted in 2010 when Google disclosed that it had collected Wi-Fi data from unsecured wireless networks as its “Street View” vehicles...
News Story
3/12/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
The controversy over Google's WiFi-poaching Street View cars ended with a whimper in the U.S., with the company getting a light fine and an order to educate its staff -- and consumers as well -- about privacy and security. "They'll post a video on YouTube, driving people to their platform where even more information will be collected...
News Release
3/11/2013
Posted by John M. Simpson
SANTA MONICA, CA – The $7 million deal announced today ending a multi-state investigation of the Google Wi-Spy scandal does virtually nothing to thwart the Internet giant’s repeated privacy violations, Consumer Watchdog said.  The public interest group said Google should pay an amount that would affect its profits. In addition to...
News Story
3/11/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google will pay a $7 million fine to settle a multistate investigation into a snoopy software program that enabled the Internet search leader to intercept emails, passwords and other sensitive information sent several years ago over unprotected wireless networks in neighborhoods across the world. The agreement announced...
News Story
3/11/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
As reported last week Google has formally settled the so-called “WiSpy” case with 30 US state Attorneys General for $7 million. The agreement also contains some other non-monetary provisions that are, frankly, more meaningful. The investigation began in 2010 concerning unauthorized collection of private emails and other “payload...
News Story
3/11/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
NEW YORK — Google agreed to pay a $7 million fine in the United States on Tuesday for stealthily collecting data from private Wi-Fi hotspots in a mapping service slip that irked an array of countries. In a legal settlement with attorneys general in 38 states, the Internet giant also agreed to ramp up employee training about data privacy and...
News Story
3/11/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
Slurp sparks states' slight slap Google is reportedly close to settling with the 30 US states that were pursuing it over the infamous StreetView Wifi data slurp. In between practicing taking the decision seriously in public, there are probably fits of giggles breaking out in Google's boardroom, because according to Reuters, the proposed...
News Story
3/11/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
SAN FRANCISCO — Google on Tuesday acknowledged to state officials that it had violated people’s privacy during its Street View mapping project when it casually scooped up passwords, e-mail and other personal information from unsuspecting computer users. In agreeing to settle a case brought by 38 states involving the project, the search...
News Story
3/11/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
Marketers hawking diet pills and other questionable goods on social media will have to be more forthcoming. Digital ads that pop up on Twitter, Facebook and other mobile sites must be accompanied by disclosures to avoid deceptive practices, according to a rule update issued Tuesday by the Federal Trade Commission. The new rule "takes into...