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News Story
7/17/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
Implementation of the EU's right-to-be-forgotten policy appears to have hit some snags, as privacy regulators tussle with search engines over how they handle link removals. The right to be forgotten is the foundation of a directive allowing citizens to have links to "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive"...
Blog Post
6/26/2014
Posted by John M. Simpson
Google today began removing some search results in Europe under the recently court-upheld “right to be forgotten.”  The Internet giant should offer U.S. users the same basic right to privacy. In May the European Court of Justice ruled that a person has the right to request the removal of search engine links to information that is...
News Story
5/16/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
Google hasn’t said much in public about how it plans to deal with a European court ruling that says individuals have a “right to be forgotten.”  But reports from across the pond suggest the company is already gearing up for a flood of requests from people who don’t want certain information about themselves showing up...
News Release
5/13/2014
Posted by John M. Simpson
SANTA MONICA, -- Consumer Watchdog today praised the highest European court’s ruling that people have a “right to be forgotten” and can have online search results linking to outdated, irrelevant information removed. “This is a substantial victory for the right to privacy,” said John M. Simpson, Consumer Watchdog...
News Story
5/13/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
Google and other Internet companies may have to comply with requests to make links to certain personal data go away -- at least, in Europe. The idea seems to be that people have a right to let some things slip into oblivion, even if there was nothing illegal about their publication. "This ruling tips the balance a little bit back towards...
News Release
3/26/2014
Posted by John M. Simpson
SANTA MONICA, CA – A proposed settlement in Europe’s antitrust investigation of Google that establishes a monitor for five years to ensure that the Internet giant keeps its promises under the deal, does not actually obligate Google to do anything in response to a request from the “Monitoring Trustee,” Consumer Watchdog...
Blog Post
3/6/2014
Posted by John M. Simpson
Back in February Consumer Watchdog wrote to 27 of the 28 members of the European Union's College of Commissioners objecting to the tentative antitrust settlement with Google on both the merits of the deal and the procedures that were being followed. Today I got a letter in response from Alexander Italianer, Director-General for Competition,...
News Release
2/10/2014
Posted by John M. Simpson
SANTA MONICA, CA – Consumer Watchdog, a U.S. public interest group, has objected to the European Union’s College of Commissioners over the antitrust settlement deal with Google that was announced last week by the Commissioner for Competition, Vice President Joaquin Almunia, the group said today. In separate letters addressed to the...
News Story
2/10/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
A U.S. consumer group on Monday added its voice to the growing criticism of Google’s proposed settlement with the European Union’s competition authorities. “We had been impressed with the strong position the Commission had taken in your investigation, unlike regulatory authorities in the United States,” wrote John Simpson,...
News Story
2/6/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union's antitrust watchdog on Wednesday accepted "far-reaching" concessions offered by Google to settle allegations it is abusing its dominant position in Internet searches, bringing the three-year-old case close to an end. Google would significantly change the ways it displays some search...