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News Release
12/2/2011
Posted by John M. Simpson
WASHINGTON, DC – Consumer Watchdog today called for a federal investigation into the "Spyphone Scandal", in which software embedded in smartphones surreptitiously tracks users' activities, including their keystrokes and numbers they dialed. The probe should extend beyond the software developer, Carrier IQ, and include...
News Story
12/2/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
The software maker has turned mobile phones into spy phones, the consumer group says IDG News Service -- Consumer Watchdog has called for a U.S. government investigation of Carrier IQ, the maker of tracking software for mobile phones, and its users. The consumer group on Friday sent letters to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S....
News Story
12/2/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
Carrier IQ's woes continue to multiply. The Mountain View, Calif., startup now faces four lawsuits over allegations that its cellphone software violates the privacy of mobile users. A congressman has also asked the U.S. Federal Trade Commission today to investigate those charges. The developments aren't terribly surprising given the...
News Story
12/2/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
Group asks for investigation of all involved parties Advocacy group Consumer Watchdog announced this afternoon that it has sent letters to the Justice Department and the FCC calling on them to investigate not only Carrier IQ, but also operating system makers, as well as handset manufacturers and phone carriers for their role in what it has...
News Story
12/1/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
A network monitoring application has privacy watchdogs up in arms after a security researcher claimed that the software is capable of recording detailed phone activity and relaying it to carriers without the user even being aware that it's present on the device. Various carriers and device makers are vehemently denying any involvement with...
Blog Post
9/9/2011
Posted by John M. Simpson
More examples of Google's powerful grip on the Internet surfaced this week and its acquisition of the venerable restaurant reviewer, Zagat, raised new concern about how the Internet giant will use its monopoly power in the future. Being a monopoly is not in itself illegal. If you developed the position naturally without breaking any laws,...