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Digital Privacy

News Story
10/12/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
The Web is porous. Remarkable information trickles in from everywhere. It also sometimes spills out without its users knowing exactly where or how. Take for instance these findings, released on Tuesday by computer scientists at Stanford University. If you type a wrong password into the Web site of The Wall Street Journal, it turns out that...
News Story
10/12/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
By signing onto many of the most popular sites on the Web, you may be unknowingly sharing your email address or name with other websites and data collection companies that help target online advertising, according to a study by Stanford computer science researchers that sparked new calls for "Do Not Track" laws after its release...
News Story
10/12/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
Websites lie about what private information they are sharing with other sites, including advertising sites like Doubleclick. That’s the bottom-line of a study by a Stanford researcher Jonathan Mayer released at an online privacy forum at the National Press Club.  The study, called Tracking the Trackers: Where Everybody Knows Your...
News Release
10/11/2011
Posted by John M. Simpson
WASHINGTON, DC – Consumer Watchdog called online industry claims that consumers' personal privacy is protected when they surf the Web to be meaningless in light of a study released today by Stanford University's Computer Security Laboratory. The research was released at a forum discussing digital data collection sponsored by a...
News Story
10/11/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
Many websites reveal even more personal information about consumers -- such as their user names and e-mail addresses -- than they previously admitted to, according to a study released on Tuesday. Privacy advocates quickly said the report supports their complaints and that they plan to use it to pressure Congress to pass do-not-track legislation...
News Story
10/11/2011
Posted by Mark Reback
A study released Tuesday shows that 45% of the top 185 U.S. websites transmit identifying details about their visitors to at least four outside websites. The data transmitted was primarily a “username” – which is the name a person uses to log into a website – or a user ID assigned by the website to a user. It was...
Blog Post
10/9/2011
Posted by John M. Simpson
Do you care about online privacy? Then join me on Tuesday morning at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, where a coalition of ten consumer and privacy groups including Consumer Watchdog are hosting a discussion on data collection and privacy. If you can't make it you can follow the event on the Web. Federal Trade Commission...