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News Story
1/22/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
Google, through its plan to link Gmail addresses to its Google+ social network, is violating a privacy agreement the company made with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, a long-time critic of the company’s privacy practices said in a complaint to the agency. Google+ also has a “flagrant and fundamental privacy design flaw”...
News Story
1/10/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
Google's privacy polices came under fire again on Friday regarding changes to its Gmail service, two days after it was fined by France for data protection violations. Gmail users could soon receive messages from people with whom they have never shared their email addresses, following the latest in a string of moves to link Google's email...
News Story
1/10/2014
Posted by Mark Reback
Google likes the proposed changes. Nobody else seems to. This past week has been a bad one for Google+ public relations. On Wednesday, Americans learned the story of Massachusetts resident Thomas Gagnon, arrested for sending his ex-girlfriend a Google+ invite in violation of a restraining order she'd taken out against him — except...
News Story
10/8/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
Consumer Watchdog disclosed that it joined the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and three other public interest groups on Aug. 22 in opposing a proposed $8.5 million settlement in a class action suit against Google for privacy violations in the way it handled users' search data because of at least "three obvious deficiencies...
News Story
4/2/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
Alma Whitten worked at Google since 2003. She took over as Google's privacy director in 2010. Following the resignation some privacy advocates have questioned whether Whitten succeeded in bringing stronger privacy regulations to Google. "During her 10 years at Google, Alma has done so much to improve our products and protect our users,...
News Story
3/13/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
Seven million dollars. That’s how much Internet giant Google will pay to settle a multi-year investigation into its controversial “Wi-Spy” data collection practices. The furor erupted in 2010 when Google disclosed that it had collected Wi-Fi data from unsecured wireless networks as its “Street View” vehicles...
News Story
3/13/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
The controversy over Google's WiFi-poaching Street View cars ended with a whimper in the U.S., with the company getting a light fine and an order to educate its staff -- and consumers as well -- about privacy and security. "They'll post a video on YouTube, driving people to their platform where even more information will be collected...
News Release
3/12/2013
Posted by John M. Simpson
SANTA MONICA, CA – The $7 million deal announced today ending a multi-state investigation of the Google Wi-Spy scandal does virtually nothing to thwart the Internet giant’s repeated privacy violations, Consumer Watchdog said.  The public interest group said Google should pay an amount that would affect its profits. In addition to...
News Story
3/12/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google will pay a $7 million fine to settle a multistate investigation into a snoopy software program that enabled the Internet search leader to intercept emails, passwords and other sensitive information sent several years ago over unprotected wireless networks in neighborhoods across the world. The agreement announced...
News Story
3/12/2013
Posted by Mark Reback
As reported last week Google has formally settled the so-called “WiSpy” case with 30 US state Attorneys General for $7 million. The agreement also contains some other non-monetary provisions that are, frankly, more meaningful. The investigation began in 2010 concerning unauthorized collection of private emails and other “payload...