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Healthcare

Healthcare

Consumer Watchdog fights to protect patients, improve health care quality and create universal care. We believe the health of patients should come before the financial wealth of health insurance companies, drug companies and other profit-driven health care corporations. We work toward a safer, affordable health care system by eliminating waste, fraud and profiteering.

In the mid to late 1990s, Consumer Watchdog pioneered the nation’s toughest HMO patients’ rights law.  During the 2000s, we uncovered outrageous practices by health insurance companies that resulted in some of the strongest protections under Obamacare. These include the bans on preexisting condition limitations, medical underwriting and the ability of insurance companies to revoke policies for innocent omissions on enrollment forms.

Our current fights include campaigns to reduce the price of prescription drugs, implement a Medicare for all system and lower health insurance rates through proven regulation that has saved drivers and home owners hundreds of billions of dollars on their insurance rates in California.

Trump’s Decision On Cost-Sharing Reduction Payments Could Hurt California Consumers

The Trump administration’s decision to give health insurers until Sept. 5 to file their 2018 rates will not have an effect in California.

That is because California insurers have already announced plans to raise rates an average of 12.5 percent next year.

California Health Care Fight May Show Democratic Party Future In Trump Era

As Democrats gear up for the 2018 election, they confront big challenges: Polls in the last election showed a general electorate that deeply distrusted the party’s leaders, while new surveys show the Democratic base has lost faith in government — and now many swing

How Would The American Healthcare Act Affect Californians?

WESTWOOD (CBSLA.com) — The Senate’s plan to replace the Affordable Care Act could be voted on next week.

If passed into law, how would the American Healthcare Act affect Californians?

Fewer people covered, higher costs for the elderly and dramatic cuts for the working poor, according to Gerald Kominski, director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.